Don’t X out Christmas




Every year I see it. All over the internet and even on Christmas cards. The phrase “Merry Xmas”, or “It’s Xmas time”, etc. 
This abbreviation has become so common that it has been called “Christogram”. 

To me and many Christians, this is crossing out Christ in the word Christ-mas. If your not Christian, you may think this complaint is just silly. Most will argue and defend the reason behind the X and that is fine. They have a point and here is what they will say.

“Oh. It’s not an X, it’s a cross”
Or
“The X” in the Greek alphabet is the symbol for the word “Chi” which is the first letter of the Greek word for Christ”. 
Blah blah blah.....

Ok I get that but why are we only advertising this Greek shortcut during Christmas? Unless you speak and spell Greek, why not spell out our Saviors name when speaking of him? 

Most people that are crossing out the word Christ in Christmas with an X do not even know why they do it. I know most people do not mean any harm in it and do not realize how bad it looks to some folks. They simply think its an “abbreviation” or shortcut. Some may just like the way it looks. I do not grudge those that chose not to spell out “Christmas” but it gets under my skin a bit to see it. 

I personally think people will argue the Greek reasons behind it just to try to prove a point or relieve their conscience during the season, because they never have a problem using the word “Jesus Christ”, “gd” or “Oh my God!” in their other vocabulary during the year. 

This was my rant for today. 
This post was not directed at any particular person or persons and meant no harm. 
Now go on out and let me know if you find the X in Christmas Shopping. 



17 comments

  1. Amen and thank you Lisa for posting this. It has always been a pet peeve of mine to see Xmas. The whole meaning of Christmas is about Christ, Xing it out makes me wonder what they are celebrating.
    A fellow Christian friend,
    Saimi

    ReplyDelete
  2. Amen, Lisa, I agree with you whole heartily. I just saw a post on Facebook that read, "X belongs in Texas, Christ belongs in Christmas".

    ReplyDelete
  3. I remember my 6th grade teacher teaching us not to X out Christmas. It has stuck with me ever since and even if I am making a personal note or list that no one will see, I write out the whole word! I do believe that most people never gave it a thought and just thought it was a fancy way to write Christmas. And, yes, someone gave me the long Greek explanation - DON'T CARE. I still say it's important to write Christ in Christmas. Thanks for spreading the word.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Even in a BIG hurry, I cannot make myself use the X. My earliest memory of X is Algebra one. Mrs Brevard stressed X is the unknown. I loved algebra.Christ is NOT unknown to me. So since I like to know answers, I use the answer. Good thought for the season lady.
    Sherry & jack

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I never looked at it like that. (Unknown). Thank you Jack!

      Delete
  5. I think I have been guilty of this at times...I hope to never, ever do it again, tho.
    MY rant...using our Lord's name in vain...EVERYONE does it, even little kids. It is one of HIS commandments....and that is serious business, folks.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I do speak and spell Greek :) And because I was raised in the Greek Orthodox religion, I understand how much symbolic weight that X carries. The abbreviation appears on many Orthodox Christian religious icons and has a significant meaning. The X literally means Jesus, so “Xmas” and “Christmas” are equivalent in every way except their lettering. I more often than not use the term "Christmas" but even when I use the term "Xmas", (which is perfectly acceptable, especially because I've grown up with and understand the meaning behind it) and someone accuses me of doing it to insult anyone is a little shortsighted. And very judgmental. My rant :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thats understandable. Thank you Martha.
      Lisa

      Delete
  7. Well written. I abbreviate a lot of words, but just can't abbreviate my Creator's name. <3

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'm not particularly religious, but I also find that abbreviation sort of a cheap shot. I did just read the comment above, though - and didn't know that origin. However, I think many people don't know it... and abberviate the same way many use the letter U to say YOU. Yuck.

    ReplyDelete
  9. It probably also has to do with print back in the day where every letter cost more. The reason America doesn't spell color with the extra u, from what I hear.

    Easter and Christmas can certainly confuse many a lot. In truth 90% of what we celebrate in America for both are taken from the Germanic pagan holidays. Christmas is a stolen winter festival and Easter is a stolen spring festival. Heard of Yuletide? That was never Christian in origin.

    Easter gets its name from Eostre, Germanic goddess of springtime. The Church didn't even bother trying to hide that one.

    The more Christian name would have been Pascha from the Greek/Latin. That in truth is a spin on the Jewish holiday Passover which is Pesach in Hebrew. Like Hanukkah-Christmas, they take place during the same time frame more or less.

    This is a reason some Christians, the old Puritans (English and American Christians during the Stuart/Hanover days), and other sects like Jehovas won't celebrate the holidays due to its pagan origins.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wow, you did a lot of research to prove your theory. This was interesting though.
      Thanks Adam.

      Delete
  10. I mentioned you in my post today....

    ReplyDelete
  11. Amen! I won't buy it if it is spelled that way. I love saying Merry Christmas. We have to laugh when people have been forced to say "Happy Holidays", which actually means Happy Holy Days. Yes, it is a holy day for those of us who believe in Christ and that is whose birthday we are celebrating, even if the early church did want to make it easy for new converts by celebrating Christian holy days around the days that non Christians had been using for celebrations.
    Thanks for ranting!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. “Happy Holy Day”, Yes I heard that explained like that before. I love it. I dont mind saying happy Holidays during the festive season but I keep it Christmas when I talk about that special day. Thank you Jacqueline.

      Delete
  12. You keep ranting

    (as Doritos used to say...we'll bake more)

    ReplyDelete
  13. While I had never thought about it I absolutely see your point..

    http://www.henatayeb.blogspot.com

    ReplyDelete

I read every single comment as they brighten my day. Sometimes I will reply back to them here especially if you are a no reply blogger, so be sure to check back later.